Tag Archives: skin care and facial Geneva

Sun Is Beneficial To Skin

Skin Benefits From The Sun

By Dr. Michael Murray

This time of year, everyone wants to be outside. It feels so good to have the warm sun on our bare skin. If you haven’t heard that being out in the sun, unprotected by sunscreen, puts you at risk for wrinkles (at best) and skin cancer (at worst) then you’ve probably been living under a rock!

However, while most people are aware of the dangers of too much sun, many don’t realize that sunlight confers enormous health benefits as well. Keeping in mind that you need to protect your skin with a high-quality sunscreen when you go outdoors, let’s look at some of the surprising benefits of sunlight.

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Sunlight may help prevent cancer. It’s not just plants that metabolize sunlight. Humans do, too. Through a complex process, our bodies turn sunlight into life-giving vitamin D.

The connection between vitamin D deficiency and cancer was first made by Drs. Frank and Cedric Garland from the University of California, San Diego. After finding that the incidence of colon cancer was nearly three times higher in New York than in New Mexico, the Garland brothers hypothesized that lack of sun exposure, resulting in a vitamin D deficiency, played a role.

Research now indicates that being deficient in vitamin D increases the risk of many cancers, especially breast and colon. For example, a four-year, placebo-controlled study involving 1,179 postmenopausal women concluded that vitamin D supplementation produced a dramatic 60 percent drop in the risk of developing any form of cancer.

Sunlight is beneficial for Alzheimer’s patients.
Clinical research has shown that exposure to full-spectrum light throughout the day coupled with darkness at night can help improve some aspects of Alzheimer’s disease—reducing agitation, increasing sleep efficiency, decreasing nighttime wakefulness and decreasing nighttime activity in these patients.

Sunlight may lower risk for multiple sclerosis.
MS is more common in populations that live farther from the equator. People who move from a low-risk area to a high-risk area before the age of 15 acquire a higher risk of developing MS, whereas those who make the same move after adolescence retain a lower risk. These observations suggest that environmental exposure, and in particular, early sunlight exposure (which is correlated with vitamin D levels) in the first two decades of life, influences the risk of developing MS.

Related to this finding, several European population studies observed that there is a lower risk of MS for births occurring after October and a higher risk for MS for births occurring after May. This suggests that maternal levels of vitamin D during the third trimester of pregnancy may influence risk of MS.

Sunlight helps heal psoriasis.
Exposure to sunlight is extremely beneficial for individuals with psoriasis. In one study, an outdoor four-week sunbathing therapy was shown to promote significant clearance of psoriatic symptoms in 84 percent of subjects.

Sunlight can ease mild depression.
There has been a lot of research on the link between sunlight and mood. One solid study found that sunlight actually increases levels of a natural antidepressant in the brain. On sunny days, the brain produces more of the mood-lifting chemical serotonin than on darker days.

Sunlight contributes to bone health in older adults.
It is well known that vitamin D stimulates the absorption of bone-strengthening calcium. The process of vitamin D manufacture begins when sunlight changes the 7-dehydrocholesterol in the skin into vitamin D3. Emerging research is showing a direct correlation between both bone density and blood levels of vitamin D3. Higher blood levels of vitamin D3 are associated with a lower rate of fractures of virtually all types; lower blood levels of vitamin D3 are associated with a higher rate of fractures of all types.

Sunlight can improve sleep quality.
When sunlight hits your eyes, your optic nerve sends a message to the gland in the brain that produces melatonin (a hormone that helps you sleep); the gland decreases its secretions of melatonin until the sun goes down again. In other words, exposure to sunlight during the day increases the natural production of melatonin at night. Low levels of melatonin production are linked to poor sleep quality, especially in older adults.

Skincare News via http://www.care2.com/greenliving/author/drmurray

Geneva Skin care and facial

To find out more about the importance of facials and natural skin care products, please contact Skin Care Plus. We use and recommend the best natural and organic skin care products available. We also offer other skin care treatments that can help with anti-aging and overall skin health, including the best facial in the greater Chicago area, including Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles.

Posted in Anti-aging, Beauty Tips, Facials, Health, Nutrition, Skin Cancer, Skin Care, Sun Screen Also tagged , , , |

Better Skin With Better Makeup Tips

Cosmetics Can Harm Your Skin

Avoid Makeup: During summer, less makeup is best when possible. If you use foundation, be sure to apply face powder with SPF to avoid patchy skin. To protect your lips, always use a gloss or a lip balm with an SPF 15 to make them feel fresh. Avoid eye makeup and let your skin breathe and soak in Vitamin D.

Geneva skin care and facial

Removing Makeup: Your skin needs sleep to renew itself. If you’re wearing makeup while your skin is under repair, it often causes blemishes and dryness. Before you go to bed, gently wash away your makeup and apply a nighttime moisturizer.

When makeup is removed in an incorrect manner, it leads to irritation on the face and promotes premature aging and varying skin tone. Use face wipes to remove makeup, but do it properly to avoid damaging and stretching your skin. Removing makeup in the wrong way can irritate the skin and promote premature aging. Be sure to gently remove makeup from your forehead first. Wipe it from the middle of the forehead to the left and then rub back to the middle and to the right.

Then wrap the wipe around your finger, exposing the unused side and gently sweep it across the eyelids towards the outer corners. Use your ring finger to avoid applying excessive pressure on your delicate skin. For your cheeks, repeatedly sweep the wipe upwards towards your ears. The upward movement will not cause your skin to stretch and sag. Simple tips can go a very long way toward better skin.

To find out more about the importance of facials and natural skin care products, please contact Skin Care Plus. We use and recommend the best natural and organic skin care products available. We also offer other skin care treatments that can help with anti-aging and overall skin health, including the best facial in the greater Chicago area, including Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles.

Geneva Skin care and facial

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Long-term Research Links Dairy and High-Sugar Foods to Acne

Editor’s Note: This is a great article abut the link between diet and acne–especially dairy and sugar. Diet is part of the equation. Natural skin care products and personal treatments are also the best ways to prevent and manage all skin care conditions.

Acne Linked To Dietary Factors

Review of 50 years of clinical studies indicates there may be a link between diet and acne after all. It’s been a subject of debate for decades, but it seems diet really does have an impact on a person’s complexion.

Geneva skin care and facial

A landmark overview of research carried out over the past 50 years has found that eating foods with a high glycaemic index (GI) and drinking milk not only aggravated acne, but in some cases triggered it, too. Millions of teenagers – and increasingly adults – are affected by the often painful skin condition which causes the skin to develop unsightly spots on the face, neck, chest and back. Could cutting out milk be the cure for those suffering with acne?

Acne is caused by a combination of the skin producing too much sebum and a build-up of dead skin cells which clog the pores and leads to a localized infection or spot. It is thought that excess sebum production is caused by hormonal fluctuations, which explains why around 80% of teenagers experience bouts of acne throughout adolescence. While there is no danger from the spots themselves, severe acne can scar as well as lead to anxiety, low self-esteem and depression.

Since the late 19th century, research has linked diet to acne, with chocolate, sugar and fat singled out as the main culprits. But studies carried out from the 1960s onwards have disassociated diet from the development of the condition.

Jennifer Burris, researcher and doctoral candidate within New York University’s Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health in Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, says, “This change [in attitude] occurred largely because of the two important studies that are repeatedly cited in the literature and popular culture as evidence to refute the association between diet and acne.

“More recently, dermatologists and registered dietitians have revisited the diet-acne relationship and become increasingly interested in the role of medical nutritional therapy in acne treatment.”

Eating high GI foods – foods that are absorbed into the bloodstream quickly – is thought to have a direct effect on the severity of acne because of the hormonal fluctuations that are triggered. High GI foods cause a spike in hormone levels including insulin which is thought to instigate sebum production. A 2007 Australian study showed that young males who were put on a strict low GI diet noticed a significant improvement in the severity of their acne.

Milk is thought to affect acne because of the hormones it contains. A 2007 study by Harvard School of Public Health found that there was a clear link between those who drank milk regularly and suffered with acne. Interestingly, those who drank skimmed milk suffered with the worst breakouts, with a 44% increase in the likelihood of developing blemishes. It is thought that processing the milk increases the levels of hormones in the drink.

Low GI foods

  • Only carbohydrates have a GI rating.
  • Because low GI foods take longer for the body to break down they help you feel fuller for longer too.
  • High GI foods include sugary fizzy drinks, cakes, pastries, chocolate, white bread and potatoes.
  • Low GI foods include fruit and vegetables, wholegrain options such as brown pasta, basmati rice, couscous and pulses.
  • Not overcooking your pasta and vegetables helps lower the GI.

The authors of the latest overview – published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – say that dermatologists and dietitians should work together to design and conduct quality research to help the millions of acne sufferers.

“This research is necessary to fully understand the underlying mechanisms linking diet and acne,” adds Burris.

“The medical community should not dismiss the possibility of diet therapy as an adjunct treatment for acne. At this time, the best approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling.”

To find out more about the importance of facials and natural skin care products, please contact Skin Care Plus. We use and recommend the best natural and organic skin care products available. We also offer other skin care treatments that can help with anti-aging and overall skin health, including the best facial in the greater Chicago area, including Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles.

Geneva Skin care and facial

Posted in Acne, Diet, Health, Nutrition, Skin Care Also tagged , , , |

Making Natural Body Lotion Is Good For Your Health, Wallet

 Natural Skin Care Products Easy To Make

Lotion is a top offender for beauty products. The skin is the biggest organ in the body, and many chemicals can be absorbed by the skin and stored in fat tissue. If you’re tired of all the chemicals and fragrances added to most store-bought creams and lotions, consider making your own—it isn’t difficult.

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Natural Substitutes: The best natural lotion I have found so far is just pure organic Coconut Oil. It is able to penetrate the skin and the medium chain fatty acids help with wrinkles, dry skin, and other skin problems and since it is naturally antibacterial, it won’t cause breakouts. There are also countless ways to combine coconut oil with other oils, butters, essential oils and herbs to create solutions for your specific skin. I frequently make my own and give them as gifts to friends and family members who seem to love them.

If you can, I recommend that you keep an old blender, a small- to medium-size glass bowl, and a spatula that you use solely for making natural aromatherapy products. While you can use your kitchen blender, the beeswax found in natural creams can leave a residue on the blender and utensils used. Here’s what you’ll need:

3/4 cup of pure oil (I like sweet almond oil since it absorbs well and doesn’t leave a greasy film.
1 cup of pure water (or use rose water)
2 Tablespoons of shaved beeswax (be sure to avoid other types of wax since they are made of petroleum byproducts)
30 drops of essential oils (like lavender, ylang ylang, bergamot, or other oil. Make sure you avoid “fragrance oil” since it is synthetic. Lavender is a great one to start with since it is aromatic but also soothes sunburns, other types of burns, and is healing for most skin types).
a glass jar or small glass jars for storing the lotion

Making The Lotion: Pour the oil into a Pyrex measuring cup and add the shaved beeswax. Set it in a saucepan of water that reaches about halfway up the side of the Pyrex container. Heat over the stove until the beeswax dissolves and remove from the stove immediately. Allow to cool for a minute or two but not longer than that since the beeswax will begin to harden.

Pour the water into your blender and begin blending it on high speed with the lid on (with a hole left in the lid for pouring the beeswax-oil mixture). Slowly pour the oil-beeswax mixture into the water. It will begin to emulsify as you continue pouring the oil. It normally begins to thicken after about three-quarters of the oil has been incorporated. Continue adding the oil until you’ve incorporated all of it into the water.

Add the drops of essential oils you’ve selected. Blend them into the lotion. Pour the lotion into the glass jars you’ve selected for storing the cream. Use the spatula to remove any remaining lotion from the blender. The lotion lasts for about 6 months and is best kept at cool temperatures to prolong shelf life. You can store it in the fridge if you choose to keep it fresh.

For more information about personal and natural skin care, including the best facials in the greater Chicago area (including, Geneva, St. Charles, Batavia and Wheaton), contact Joan Kesman at Skin Care Plus.

To find out more about the importance of facials and natural skin care products, please contact Skin Care Plus. We use and recommend the best natural and organic skin care products available. We also offer other skin care treatments that can help with anti-aging and overall skin health, including the best facial in the greater Chicago area, including Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles.

Geneva Skin care and facial

Posted in Body Lotion, Natural Skin Care Products, Skin Care Products Also tagged , , , |