Tag Archives: acne treatment Geneva

Acne The Most Common Skin Condition

Acne Prevention and Treatment Tips

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, but many women with the condition do the wrong things to prevent it and treat it. Dermatologists know that letting acne run its course is rarely the best advice:

  • Without treatment, dark spots and permanent scars can appear on the skin as acne clears;
  • Treating acne often boosts a person’s self-esteem;
  • Many effective treatments are available;
  • More women are getting acne; A growing number of women have acne in their 30s, 40s, 50s and beyond.

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Touching Your Blemishes

Touching your pimples is one of the worst things to do with acne. Serious consequences that result from touching acne include the worsening of inflammation, spread of infection and a longer healing process. When you squeeze a pimple, the risk of scarring is multiplied. The only dermal manipulation recommended for skin blemishes and acne are deep cleansing techniques carried out by a facial skin esthetician or a dermatologist. Deep pore-cleansing facials are not designed for severe acne, but remove blackheads and impurities. They are for people with oily skin or mild acne. Only a licensed physician can address severe acne with cysts, the “buttons” of inflammation under acne blemishes.

Sleeping With Makeup

It’s OK to wear makeup when you have acne, but not removing your makeup before bedtime is a sin. Makeup left overnight hinders skin renewal and clogs your pores, which can cause inflammation.

Cleansing Your Skin Excessively

Cleansing the skin excessively is a mistake because it only aggravates the skin, without addressing the problem. The main cause of acne is an overproduction of sebum by sebaceous glands at the root of hair follicles. Skin that is irritated by too many cleansing products will start producing more sebum, not less, creating an environment conducive to acne. It is actually more effective and less harmful to use a single cleansing product, once or twice per day at most. Also use an acne cream or spot-drying treatment once daily.

Topical Treatments vs. Comprehensive Care

When suffering from acne, it is common to focus on affected areas by cleansing or using various daily treatments, while ignoring other factors and possible causes. Acne triggers include excess sebum, stress, high levels of progesterone, tobacco use and high blood sugar—as well as many others. A comprehensive treatment is recommended, regardless of age.

Harmful Skin Care Products

Certain ingredients in your moisturizer, toner and sunscreen can irritate your skin and cause break outs. Mineral oil, petrolatum, lanolin, perfume and artificial colors are the usual offenders, but even alcohol can overly dry your skin and cause your skin to produce more sebum. Read the labels of your skin and body care products and makeup to avoid non-comedogenic (doesn’t clog pores), oil-free, fragrance-free and alcohol-free.

Clean Your Makeup Brushes

Sometimes, it’s not the makeup behind your acne, it’s your bacteria-laden makeup brushes and sponges. To keep your skin clear, wash your applicators at least once a week with a gentle cleanser designed for that purpose.

Apply Your Spot Treatment Properly

It’s not enough that you know what spot treatment is best for acne. Knowing when to use it, how often to apply and how long to wear it is absolutely crucial. Benzoyl peroxide, an ingredient commonly found in acne treatments, has a 1–3-hour working time, and any cream that comes in contact with it before it has completed its work will likely inhibit the active ingredient from working properly. Wait at least an hour before applying moisturizer and/or sunscreen for best results.

Too Much Sun

Frequent sun tanning can trigger breakouts on those with acne-prone skin. Sun, heat and humidity can cause oil glands to become overactive, which can lead to acne breakouts. Also, apply sunscreen. Choose an oil-free, non-comedogenic product.

Change Your Pillowcase

If you’re not changing your pillowcase, you’re basically lying on accumulated dust and dead skin cells. Your bath towel could be harboring as much acne-causing bacteria.

Too Much Medication

Applying too much medication, or applying too often will cause excessive drying, redness, peeling, and irritation. Using your medications exactly as directed is the best way to clear acne, without harming your skin.

Geneva Skin care and facial

To find out more about the importance of facials and natural skin care products, please contact Skin Care Plus. We use and recommend the best natural and organic skin care products available. We also offer other skin care treatments that can help with anti-aging and overall skin health, including the best facial in the greater Chicago area, including Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles.

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Research Links Dairy, Sugar To Acne

Editor’s Note: This is a great article abut the link between diet and acne–especially dairy and sugar. Diet is part of the equation. Natural skin care products and personal treatments are also the best ways to prevent and manage all skin care conditions.

Acne Linked To Dietary Factors

Review of 50 years of clinical studies indicates there may be a link between diet and acne after all. It’s been a subject of debate for decades, but it seems diet really does have an impact on a person’s complexion.

A landmark overview of research carried out over the past 50 years has found that eating foods with a high glycaemic index (GI) and drinking milk not only aggravated acne, but in some cases triggered it, too. Millions of teenagers – and increasingly adults – are affected by the often painful skin condition which causes the skin to develop unsightly spots on the face, neck, chest and back. Could cutting out milk be the cure for those suffering with acne?

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Acne is caused by a combination of the skin producing too much sebum and a build-up of dead skin cells which clog the pores and leads to a localized infection or spot. It is thought that excess sebum production is caused by hormonal fluctuations, which explains why around 80% of teenagers experience bouts of acne throughout adolescence. While there is no danger from the spots themselves, severe acne can scar as well as lead to anxiety, low self-esteem and depression.

Since the late 19th century, research has linked diet to acne, with chocolate, sugar and fat singled out as the main culprits. But studies carried out from the 1960s onwards have disassociated diet from the development of the condition.

Jennifer Burris, researcher and doctoral candidate within New York University’s Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health in Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, says, “This change [in attitude] occurred largely because of the two important studies that are repeatedly cited in the literature and popular culture as evidence to refute the association between diet and acne.

“More recently, dermatologists and registered dietitians have revisited the diet-acne relationship and become increasingly interested in the role of medical nutritional therapy in acne treatment.”

Eating high GI foods – foods that are absorbed into the bloodstream quickly – is thought to have a direct effect on the severity of acne because of the hormonal fluctuations that are triggered. High GI foods cause a spike in hormone levels including insulin which is thought to instigate sebum production. A 2007 Australian study showed that young males who were put on a strict low GI diet noticed a significant improvement in the severity of their acne.

Milk is thought to affect acne because of the hormones it contains. A 2007 study by Harvard School of Public Health found that there was a clear link between those who drank milk regularly and suffered with acne. Interestingly, those who drank skimmed milk suffered with the worst breakouts, with a 44% increase in the likelihood of developing blemishes. It is thought that processing the milk increases the levels of hormones in the drink.

Low GI foods

  • Only carbohydrates have a GI rating.
  • Because low GI foods take longer for the body to break down they help you feel fuller for longer too.
  • High GI foods include sugary fizzy drinks, cakes, pastries, chocolate, white bread and potatoes.
  • Low GI foods include fruit and vegetables, wholegrain options such as brown pasta, basmati rice, couscous and pulses.
  • Not overcooking your pasta and vegetables helps lower the GI.

The authors of the latest overview – published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics – say that dermatologists and dietitians should work together to design and conduct quality research to help the millions of acne sufferers.

“This research is necessary to fully understand the underlying mechanisms linking diet and acne,” adds Burris.

“The medical community should not dismiss the possibility of diet therapy as an adjunct treatment for acne. At this time, the best approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling.”

Geneva Skin care and facial

To find out more about the importance of facials and natural skin care products, please contact Skin Care Plus. We use and recommend the best natural and organic skin care products available. We also offer other skin care treatments that can help with anti-aging and overall skin health, including the best facial in the greater Chicago area, including Batavia, Geneva, and St. Charles.

Posted in Acne, Diet, Nutrition, Skin Care Also tagged , , , , |